Rainy Streets


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Lack of Bias [...]

John Dilulio, so treat these facts with caution: > It is often asserted that the 1980s war on drugs resulted in a more racially “disproportionate” prison population. The data tell a different story. In 1980, 46.6 percent of state prisoners and 34.4 percent of federal prisoners were black; by 1990, 48.9 percent of state prisoners and 31.4 percent of federal prison...

 

Failure to Deal With Partisan Politics [...]

> Other countries have figured out how to administer elections in a nonpartisan way, but not the United States. And for that, we can blame the electoral system set up at this country’s birth, when the Founding Fathers made two crucial—and mistaken—assumptions. First, they thought they could prevent political “factions” from coalescing into two stable and ant...

 

Seven Percent Dissolution [...]

> Sixty-five percent said the jarring language in politics is unjustified, while 3-in-10 believe it is, indeed, justified given the current state of the nation. There’s a deep divide among supporters of whether the language is justified, though: 47 percent of Trump’s supporters said it is; just 17 percent of Clinton’s supporters agreed. > > “Half of Trump sup...

 

Shy Tories [...]

> natesilver: The original “shy” term comes from “shy Tories,” and the idea was that British voters didn’t want to admit to voting for a party that was plodding and un-hip, or at least they were less enthusiastic about responding to pollsters. > > So that sounds more like Clinton’s voters than Trump’s, if anything. > > The social desirability idea is a...

 

Many Words for Snow [...]

> Yet Igor Krupnik, an anthropologist at the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Washington, believes that Boas was careful to include only words representing meaningful distinctions. Taking the same care with their own work, Krupnik and others charted the vocabulary of about 10 Inuit and Yupik dialects and concluded that they indeed have many more words for snow tha...

 

License Now [...]

> However, it may also be that most people simply haven’t yet realized that they’ve given anything up. Such confusion is at least in part explainable by businesses continued use of words that imply ownership, such as “buy.” When Perzanowski and Hoofnagle’s tested a version of the Media Shop that replaced the “Buy now” button with a “License now” butt...

 

Fordlandia [...]

> In 1927, Henry Ford, the richest man in the world, bought a tract of land twice the size of Delaware in the Brazilian Amazon. His intention was to grow rubber, but the project rapidly evolved into a more ambitious bid to export America itself, along with its golf courses, ice-cream shops, bandstands, indoor plumbing, and Model Ts rolling down broad streets. > Fordla...

 

Deere DRM [...]

> Owners of John Deere tractors discovered that they can’t legally fix their own equipment, because according to the company, the buyer only acquires “an implied license for the life of the vehicle to operate the vehicle.” Those terms prevent third-party mechanics from using diagnostic software to determine why the tractor is broken, effectively making it imposs...

 

Failed To Be Thin [...]

> That’s the same dislike and distrust that makes fat people less likely to be hired for jobs, take home equal pay or receive adequate medical care under their insurance. It’s that dislike and distrust that make it socially acceptable (a public service, even!) to harass and verbally abuse fat people. It’s the reason why most clothing labels refuse to make garmen...

 

Hitler the Dunderhead [...]

> Hitler’s ascension was aided and abetted by the naïveté of domestic adversaries who failed to appreciate his ruthlessness and tenacity, and by foreign statesmen who believed they could control his aggression. Early on, revulsion at Hitler’s style and appearance, Mr. Ullrich writes, led some critics to underestimate the man and his popularity, while others dism...

 

Abacus school [...]

> Abacus or abaco refers to calculations, especially the subject of direct calculations, using Hindu numerals without the help of the abacus (an instrument for calculating).[1] Abacus school is a term applied to any Italian school or tutorial after the 13th century, whose commerce-directed curriculum placed special emphasis on mathematics, such as algebra, among other...

 

The Manner and Form (1553) [...]

> The maner and fourme (1553) > [7] The starting point for this reading of Peele’s books is the impressive title page of  The maner and fourme (see figure 1, below). The rebus of its printer, Richard Grafton, appears prominently at the bottom of the page, depicting a ‘tun’ or barrel, from which issues a grafted tree, probably the tree of knowledge, the whole b...

 

Funding Pressures [...]

> Debbie Sills, national managing director of public sector practice at Deloitte Consulting, said US states have “primarily” cut funding to public higher education because they have “funding pressures”, not because their “philosophical belief” in the value of universities has changed. > She said that healthcare is taking an “enormous part of their budget...

 

Obama Effect (Education) [...]

> While access might be a part of that, without a narrative shift access is meaningless. We have examples such as the Obama effect, where it is speculated that black students closed the achievement gap on standardized test because of the positive reinforcement that came from all directions in culture during the campaign of Barack Obama. The blip in the test scores did...

 

Rush City Transformed [...]

> Richard Neutra's Rush City Transformed, from 1928. Ninety percent Non-Space, combined with some sterile megabuildings. You don't even have to build it to know that the result is going to be 90% suckitude, and the remaining 10% mega-sterile. It's inevitable. > > - An additional issue here is [[Defensible Space]]...

 

Green Space Not Sustainable [...]

> I don't think many people realize how much this poisonous Green Space concept has infected our ideas of how to build cities. For example: > > > Clackamas County, Oregon. > > Title 12: Zoning and Development Ordinance. > > Section 1000: Development Standards. > > > > 1009 Landscaping, 1009.02 Minimum Area Standard > > > > The minimum area requirements may include ...

 

Garden City Movement [...]

> The garden city movement is a method of urban planning that was initiated in 1898 by Sir Ebenezer Howard in the United Kingdom. Garden cities were intended to be planned, self-contained communities surrounded by "greenbelts", containing proportionate areas of residences, industry, and agriculture. > > Inspired by the utopian novel Looking Backward and Henry George'...

 

There’s No There There [...]

> "There's no there there," said Gertrude Stein famously about Oakland, California. She was speaking on a vague, aesthetic level, but it is also true on a physical, square-feet kind of level too. I say that there are two kinds of sqare-footage in a city: Places and Non-Places. > > Places are areas where things happen. This includes: > > Houses > Offices > Factories ...

 

Goutte – Web Scraping Library [...]

> Goutte – Web Scraping Library > > Goutte is a library for scraping websites and extracting data. It provides a nice API that makes it easy to select specific elements from the remote pages....

 

Palantir Discrimination [...]

Palantir accused of racism. >Privately held Palantir helps government agencies track down terrorists and uncover financial fraud. It raised $880 million in funding late last year, for a $20 billion valuation, and is considered one of Silicon Valley's most secretive companies. > Palantir was co-founded by Peter Thiel and Joe Lonsdale, two of Silicon Valley's more infl...

 

Air Loom [...]

> Matthews believed that a gang of criminals and spies skilled in pneumatic chemistry had taken up residence at London Wall in Moorfields (close to Bethlem) and were tormenting him by means of rays emitted by a machine called the "Air Loom". The torments induced by the rays included "Lobster-cracking", during which the circulation of the blood was prevented by a magne...

 

A Mirror of Chavez [...]

Cosmopolitan talks to Machado and gets the comparison that no one saw: > Trump’s sudden and unexpected rise as a political figure has jolted Machado into action. After the New York Times called her for a story that ran in May detailing dozens of women’s allegations of sexual harassment, she realized she needed to speak up more about her experience with him and wa...

 

Where Did You Find This? [...]

> You can easily see why Clinton’s campaign decided this was the perfect anecdote to display his grotesque personal qualities. It contains several elements all at once. There is Trump’s lecherous habit of creeping around beauty contestants, which is its own deep vein of gross behavior. There is the cruel reduction of women to their appearance. And there is the ant...

 

Watergate and Access [...]

> "Woodward and Bernstein of 1972-74 didn't have such access, and this probably influencedfor the bettertheir view of what Nixon and his men were capable of. Watergate wasn't broken by reporters who had entree to the inner corridors of power. It was two guys on the Metro Desk."...

 

Novelty Demands Novelty [...]

> I agree with the Atlantic’s James Fallows about Trump. “No one like him has gotten this close to the presidency in modern times.” Which is not to say he came out of nowhere, or that there is no precedent for his political style. A long series of developments left the presidential nominating system and the Republican party vulnerable to Trump. A long series of ...

 

Technical Debt of the 2016 Race [...]

> Josh thought this had happened with the Republican Party. For example, “a large portion of the GOP is not satisfied with what can realistically be achieved by conventional political means.” It should have found a way to put this to its most demanding supporters, but there was always a reason to avoid that massive reckoning. This left it vulnerable to a huckster ...

 

Asymmetric Polarization [...]

> Four years later, Dan Balz of the Washington Post, probably the most respected figure in the political press, admitted that Mann and Ornstein were onto something. “They were ahead of others in describing the underlying causes of polarization as asymmetrical,” he wrote. Why did it take four years? (In 2012 and 2014 Balz was noncommittal about the thesis.) Two ans...

 

Scoured Everything [...]

> A teacher living outside Chicago, she added that she had "scoured everything" about why vaccines might be harmful and had become "pretty convinced." She chose not to vaccinate based on the results of her research but had read only material that cast doubt. > > "I put my kids at risk," she said. "I wish that I had taken more time to research from both sides before m...

 

Digital Hustle [...]

> I found these workers relied on their smartphones — and sometimes free Wi-Fi at restaurants and libraries — as essential tools in their digital hustle. They used their phones to find and coordinate work and care, and to alleviate stress in emotionally draining jobs. For many, making ends meet means constantly checking and participating in online networks...