Rainy Streets


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Mr. Diversity [...]

> What really brought the shift was pointed criticism by a group of writers and social scientists who pointed out that Florida's "creative class" had either failed to reverse the decline of cities that had lost their economic engines to globalization and automation, or fueled gentrification and inequality in the places where it seemed to work. > Other research reveale...

 

Support for Trade Is Increasing [...]

> This election featured the rise of two vociferously anti–free trade candidates in Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump, which helped force Hillary Clinton (long a fence straddler on the issue) to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal the Obama administration is currently pushing. > > The timing for this turn against trade, however, is puzzling, giv...

 

People Are Not Pissed [...]

> The American people are not pissed at the state of the economy. At all. > > They’re as happy as they were in 1984, when Ronald Reagan won a landslide reelection. They largely approve of their president. They overwhelmingly support free trade and oppose immigration restriction, and in both cases the public is becoming more pro-globalization, not less. Donald Trump...

 

Narrative Historicism [...]

> Narrative Historicism uses storytelling as its method of imposing order. It inverts the standard critical structure. Rather than embedding stories in an argument, it embeds arguments in a story. The narrative asserts relevance, identifies influence and qualifies importance. It draws out nuances of personality, of moments in time, of settings and disputes and gesture...

 

Phantom of Heilbronn [...]

A case of systemic error. > The Phantom of Heilbronn, often alternatively referred to as the "Woman Without a Face", was a hypothesized unknown female serial killer whose existence was inferred from DNA evidence found at numerous crime scenes in Austria, France and Germany from 1993 to 2009. The six murders among these included that of police officer Michèle Kiesewet...

 

Paradox of Unanimity [...]

> Imagine a police lineup where ten witnesses are asked to identify a bank robber they glimpsed fleeing the scene. If six of them pick the same person, there’s a good chance that’s the culprit. And if all ten do, you might think the case is rock solid. But sometimes, the closer you start to get to total agreement, the less reliable the result becomes. Derek Abbott...

 

Pre-suasion [...]

> Pre-suasion works by focusing people’s preliminary attention on a selected concept — let’s say softness — which spurs them to overvalue related opportunities that immediately follow. In one study, visitors to an online sofa store were sent to a site that depicted either soft clouds or small coins in the background of its landing page. Those who saw the sof...

 

Niceties are Necessities [...]

> Around the world, there are many, many places that lack the “niceties of liberal democracy.” You don’t want to live there. You would quickly discover that the niceties are more like necessities — a rule of law necessary to live a good, decent, and free life....

 

The Alt-Right and David French [...]

> French’s adopted daughter is black and was called “niglet” and “dindu” by French’s online harassers, who also claimed his wife cheated on him with black men while he was deployed to Iraq. It's a common charge among far-right internet trolls who often accuse others of being cuckolded, both sexually and ideologically. > > French recounts how, immediately ...

 

No. 1 Position in Google Gets 33% of Search Traffic [Study] | Search Engine Watch [...]

> New findings from online ad network Chitika confirm it’s anything but lonely at the top. According to the study, the top listing in Google’s organic search results receives 33 percent of the traffic, compared to 18 percent for the second position, and the traffic only degrades from there:...

 

Can Higher Education Save the Web? [...]

As an author, I'm not sure if you are reading this article online or in print. But if you are reading it online, I can tell you what is about to happen to you. If I'm lucky, maybe you'll like the article. Perhaps I'll make a point that you think you agree with, then another. And if you're like most internet users, addicted to Facebook or Twitter, it's around the third...

 

VR Groping [...]

> As it progressed, my joking comments toward BigBro442 turned angrier, and were peppered with frustrated obscenities. At first, my brother-in-law and husband laughed along with me — all they could see was the flat computer screen version of the groping. Outside the total immersion of the QuiVr world, this must have looked pretty funny, and definitely not real. > >...

 

Luck Ambassadors and Education [...]

> Schüll’s book, which was published in 2013, won applause for its exposure of the dark side of machine gambling. But some readers spotted opportunities in it. Schüll told me that she received an approach from an online education company interested in adopting the idea of “luck ambassadors”. Where is the pain point for a student who isn’t getting the answ...

 

Birth of Brookings [...]

> Back in August I wrote about just this topic ("How Russia's New Defense Doctrine Is Like Fox News"). As I argued then, there is a humorous but real parallel between Russia's response to the color revolutions and post-Soviet weakness and institution building on the American right in the late 20th century. As I argued then, movement conservatives built the Heritage Fo...

 

Facebook Hoax Hoax [...]

> An old claim that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will give away $1,000 to Facebook users if they stop sharing “stupid hoaxes” on the social media site is going viral online once again. > > Hundreds of Facebook users are sharing the message, some apparently under the mistaken impression that it is genuine. But the claim first appeared online on December 31, 2015, ...

 

Productivity vs. Age in Foraging Societies [...]

> Forager diets consist largely of foods requiring high levels of strength and skill (Kaplan et al., 2000). Meat and other important foods (e.g., tubers, larvae, honey, nuts) require extraction from a substrate (often with technology), intensive processing, and assistance from others. Hunting return rates more than double from ages 20 to 40, even though strength peaks...

 

Culture War and Campaign Volatility [...]

Campaign Volatility disappears as the 1990s culture war is launched. I feel this can't be a mere coincidence. If you think about this, this makes sense: I may be undecided about whether I am for a particular policy or not or whether someone is competent or not. But on issues of social identification I'm pretty solid. In a related way, as Sam Wang says "It does not se...

 

Pedersen Index [...]

> The Pedersen index is a measure of electoral volatility in party systems. It was described by Mogens Pedersen in a paper published in 1979 entitled The Dynamics of European Party Systems: Changing Patterns of Electoral Volatility.[1]...

 

Greater Voter Volatility in Late 1970s [...]

A 1981 article on voter volatility notes a perceived recent increase. > While there appears to be a significant amount of agreement among political scientists and political communication theorists that elections are becoming more volatile, there is a lack of consensus about the meaning that should be assigned to the volatility concept. One source of ambiguity is th...

 

Mass Communication and Voter Volatility [...]

Television exposure predicted lower voter volatility in the 1970s. > This study attempts to explicate empirically the concept of voter volatility and to test the assertion that the use of television for political news contributes to this electoral instability. Voter volatility is defined as the level of unpredictability of election outcomes from traditional demographi...

 

Mutual Knowledge vs. Common Knowledge [...]

> In logic, there is a subtle but important distinction between the concept of mutual knowledge – information that everyone (or almost everyone) knows – and common knowledge, which is not only knowledge that (almost) everyone knows, but something that (almost) everyone knows that everyone else knows (and that everyone knows that everyone else knows that everyone e...

 

Voting Math [...]

> If you are American, SSC endorses voting in this presidential election. > > Andrew Gelman, Nate Silver, and Aaron Edlin calculate the chance that a single vote will determine the election (ie break a tie in a state that breaks an Electoral College tie). It ranges from about one in ten million (if you live in a swing state) to one in a billion (if you live in a very...

 

Suicide and the Asian-American Student [...]

> This academic edge, however, comes at a hefty cost. Asian-American students have higher rates of suicidal ideation than white college students, and these pernicious thoughts translate into behavior. At Cornell University, there were 21 on-campus suicides from 1999 to 2006, 13 of which were Asian students. At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Asians accounte...

 

Intrinsic Motivation [...]

> Intrinsic motivation, as it’s known in psychology, is doing something because that activity is inherently rewarding. Extrinsic motivation is doing something for outside rewards — praise from parents, money or recognition, for instance. Goal pursuit directed by intrinsic motivation is not only more powerful, but exponentially more fulfilling....

 

Beer’s Exile [...]

Stafford Beer, creator of [[Project Cybersyn]], went into a self-imposed exile after the Chilean coup that shattered his dream. Of course, he got to influence Eno and Bowie, so it wasn't all bad. > Stafford Beer was deeply shaken by the 1973 coup, and dedicated his immediate post-Cybersyn life to helping his exiled Chilean colleagues. He separated from his wife, so...

 

Creative Nights [...]

Fatigue may boost creativity. From the WSJ: Surprisingly, fatigue may boost creative powers. For most adults, problems that require open-ended thinking are often best tackled in the evening when they are tired, according to a 2011 study in the journal Thinking & Reasoning. When 428 students were asked to solve a series of two types of problems, requiring either an...

 

Project Cybersyn [...]

Cybersyn aimed to provide market economy responsiveness to a socialist economy through cybernetics. > Project Cybersyn was a Chilean project from 1971–1973 during the presidency of Salvador Allende aimed at constructing a distributed decision support system to aid in the management of the national economy. The project consisted of four modules: an economic simul...

 

Empathy Stereotypes [...]

There really is no difference in men and women in empathy (though there may be some difference in the cultural expression of it). > People in many cultures believe that women are more emotional and empathic, whereas men are more stoic and analytical. Both men and women hold these beliefs, even about themselves. However, when my lab has asked people to record their em...

 

Externality and Maleness [...]

Male expressions are seen to react to external circumstances. Female expressions are seen to be motivated by personality and internal states. > In one study, published in the journal Emotion, my lab photographed male and female faces in various poses, such as smiles, frowns and widened eyes. Then we showed the photos to test subjects and asked why each face looked as...

 

Pearson Courseware Slump [...]

Pearson may be in a death-spiral. At the very least it needs to develop new revenue streams. > The decline in North American sales was bigger than what Pearson projected in June, Jonathan Helliwell, an analyst at Panmure Gordon & Co. in London, said in a research note. “Underlying trading is worse than expected,” Helliwell said. > College book stores are having t...

 

Other People’s Schools [...]

One of the robust findings on education is that people believe education in the country is getting worse but their local school is quite good. This is statistically inconsistent. See also [[Distrust of Data]]...

 

Dissappearance of Campaign Volatility [...]

Modern campaigns are usually locked up from the start and not much can change them. > Polarization has made it difficult for opinion to move much. The volatility in this year’s Presidential race is smaller than any race since the advent of modern polling. This is a symptom of severe political polarization, in which most Trump supporters would never consider supporti...

 

Haircut Controversy [...]

Hairgate occurred in the first months of the Clinton presidency and was dutifully covered by the media, setting the tone for future Clinton coverage. > The Bill Clinton haircut controversy, usually known as "Hairgate", was a 1993 controversy surrounding a haircut given to US President Bill Clinton on board Air Force One.[1] > > On May 18, 1993, the Belgian-American h...

 

Proper Name Trending [...]

Facebook tends to trend proper names, not subjects or events. That has interesting implications. > Our findings should be taken as demonstrative, not conclusive, as Facebook personalizes its Trending module to each individual user. Still, we found a range of naming conventions, some of them unusual and all of them destined to influence the reach of their attendant ne...

 

Overfit and the Evolution of Cognition [...]

People who react rationally to change may survive ordinary events, but may be at a disadvantage in mass extinction events. > The premise is simple, particularly coming from a machine learning, optimization and genetic algorithms background: in an environment punctuated by slow, progressive changes followed by cataclistic changes in the opposite direction, individuals...

 

Su Filindeu [...]

People want the recipe for Su Filindeu, but really, as the preparer says, the recipe is "in her hands". > Su filindeu is made by pulling and folding semolina dough into 256 perfectly even strands with the tips of your fingers, and then stretching the needle-thin wires diagonally across a circular frame in an intricate three-layer pattern. It’s so difficult and time-...

 

Academic Clumping [...]

Academic effort tends to clump around areas, leaving interesting areas unexplored. > "One of the signature problems about academia is that it seems to clump," he says. "There’s this vast space of potentially interesting topics, and you see academic clump on the same few topics." Research done in a certain subfield legitimizes the subfield and paves the way for simi...

 

Calculus Gatekeeping [...]

Maybe students don't need calculus badly taught but a foundations course that is better taught. > “We need tools for assessing student readiness for calculus,” he said, just as the AP calculus exams signal which students are ready for the next level of college math. High schools could use an alternative to calculus that would nurture the conceptual understanding v...

 

Howling Tradeoff [...]

Evolution makes tradeoffs. This one is interesting. > But in a beautiful twist of expectations, scientists have now found that the louder the monkey’s calls, the smaller the monkey’s balls. A team based out of Cambridge University came to this conclusion by comparing the size of dozens of monkeys’ testes with the hyoid bones located in their voice boxes, which ...

 

E-Waste Mountains [...]

We have a lot of electronic waste, and the results are not pretty. > As of today, over 30m tonnes of electronic waste has been thrown out so far this year, according to the World Counts. Most e-waste is sent to landfills in Asia and Africa where it is recycled by hand, exposing the people who do it to environmental hazards....

 

Regulation Q [...]

Regulation Q set interest rate caps on private accounts which worked fine until 1970s inflation made it insufferable. > Krippner goes on to describe why the old financial system fell apart. The New Deal system of finance had a series of speed bumps and firewalls across it, so that credit for certain activities had to come from certain institutions. The most well-know...

 

Reconstructing Keystrokes Via Skype [...]

Spies can use the sound of a keyboard over Skype to reconstruct what people are typing with a high degree of accuracy. > Researchers have known for a long time that acoustic signals from keyboards can be intercepted and used to spy on users, but those attacks rely on grabbing the electronic emanation from the keyboard. New research from the University of California I...

 

Cyclical Preferences [...]

Sometimes there is no majority will, to the extent that different voting schemes applied in different orders produces different results. What to do then? > What we observe is that this group lacks a will, or majority preference. In fact, there is a different majority that prefers each outcome. A coalition of libertarians and nationalists prefer Wall to Limits; a coali...

 

Access Hollywood and Polarization [...]

Polarization locks most votes in before the campaign even begins. > Polarization is so strong that other than Debate #1, which moved opinion by about four percentage points, it is looking like no existing story line can alter the trajectory of the Clinton-versus-Trump race. The primary exhibit is national polls, which have not yet shown any measurable aftermath from t...

 

Viable System Model [...]

Stafford Beer's cybernetic Viable Systems Model caught the attention of the Chilean government in the 1970s. > When Allende learned of Stafford Beer’s cybernetic Viable System Model, he was intrigued. Cybernetics was an obscure but burgeoning area of study which sought to maximize organizational efficiency through data gathering and statistical analysis, and Beer wa...

 

Welfare Chauvinism [...]

Trump supporters cannot be captured with universal support programs, because they are more interested in denying support to others than receiving support themselves. > However it’s precisely this form of universalism that many of Trump’s supporters oppose. We saw this in the original work on the Tea Party by Theda Skocpol and Vanessa Williamson, which found that ...

 

Pane RAND study [...]

The Pane RAND Study on personalization is often cited as support for personalized approaches. > In 2015, Pane and his RAND colleagues undertook the field's most comprehensive study to date. They found that 11,000 students at 62 schools trying out personalized-learning approaches made greater gains in math and reading than similar students at more traditional schools....

 

OGAS [...]

All-State Automated System, or OGAS, was a decentralized network, proposed in 1962, that was meant to connect all governing and economic activity in a way that looks very internet-like. > The full title of Glushkov’s plan – The All-State Automated System for the Gathering and Processing of Information for the Accounting, Planning and Governance of the National Ec...

 

Colors in HTML 3.2 [...]

Hate colored text? Blame HTML 3.2. > When HTML 3.2 launched in 1996, it broadened the options for web design by creating a formal set of colors for a page’s text and background. Yet browser recommendations advised limiting fonts to a group of 216 “web-safe” colors, the most that 8-bit screens could transmit legibly. As 24-bit screens became common, designers mov...

 

T-shaped Curriculum, Plastics Division [...]

Much science education is too narrow to help solve real world problems. > Since the plastics subject is so complex, both from an economic and a materialistic perspective, it is very helpful to be able to draw on my various experiences as a chemist and a consultant. As I continue my own journey of learning, I’m more and more grateful for having studied mathematics an...

 

Line-Cutting [...]

The biggest metaphor of the new white nationalism is "line-cutting". > This tension animates Arlie Hochschild’s recent book on the white working class, Strangers in Their Own Land. As a way of provoking this very question, Hochschild embeds with people living in the polluted “Cancer Alley” of Louisiana. They are people who are conscious of the environmental wre...

 

ACA as Failure of Targeted Universalism [...]

Liberals often believe that targeted universalism will win over working class southern whites, like a New New Deal. Unfortunately, the trajectory of the ACA shows otherwise. > During the primaries there was a brief back-and-forth over whether reparations should be part of Sanders’s agenda. Those arguing against it often gave the humorous answer that ending racism i...

 

Cybernetic Red Scare [...]

While never reaching the heights of Sputnik-mania, the fear that the Soviet Union could succeed by replacing capitalism with a cybernetic network was real and pressing to many in the U.S. in the 1960s. > The proclamations of Soviet cyberneticians caused considerable alarm in the West. ‘If any country were to achieve a completely integrated and controlled economy ...

 

Ellen Church [...]

Ellen Church was the first female flight attendant. > “We’ve seen similar trends in the workplace: As women join a profession, men leave it,” Wade adds. There was a time, for instance, when all flight attendants were men — until a registered nurse named Ellen Church was hired by United Airlines in 1930. Other airlines followed suit, and by 1936, women had all ...

 

Stability of Race, 2016 [...]

> I have a question for readers. To me, it is plain that this year’s race is statistically highly stable, i.e. it hasn’t moved up and down very much. I am occasionally met with incomprehension or disbelief, even after showing a graph like the one able. Is the difficulty simply the emotional nature of this year’s race? Or is something else at work?...

 

Better Off People Doing Poorly [...]

A description of Trump's base is not really the working class or even the white working class, but rather "better off people doing poorly". > We should also note that Trump’s white working class is a bit of a myth. Even Democrats doing poorly here is a bit off. In general, as Stan Greenberg notes, there’s a strong regional component here, with Democrats doing poor...

 

First Algebra Textbook [...]

Textbooks sometimes change the world. The first textbook on algebra powered the merchant computations that made the Rennaissance possible. >While many secondary school students struggling through math classes may not particularly appreciate the importance of algebra, it is one of the most important contributions of the Muslim Golden Age to the modern world. It was de...

 

Circular Economy Principles [...]

> The circular economy provides multiple value creation mechanisms that are decoupled from the consumption of finite resources. In a true circular economy, consumption happens only in effective bio-cycles; elsewhere use replaces consumption. Resources are regenerated in the bio-cycle or recovered and restored in the technical cycle. In the bio-cycle, life processes re...

 

Economic Automated Management System [...]

One of the first proposals for a national public computing network was made by the Soviets. In the 1950s, the Soviet Union needed computer power for central planning badly, and a proposal was made to turn military computers to that use in off-hours. The tight hold of the military on those resources prevented that from happening. > In 1959, as the director of a secret ...

 

Andrea Kowch [...]

> Drawing inspiration from the Southern Gothic tradition, Andrea Kowch creates chilling and richly narrative paintings with a heavy Andrew Wyeth influence....

 

Trust Your Gut [...]

Post-truth politics survives through a belief that the public can be smarter than experts by "trusting their gut". > Post-truth politics is made possible by two threats to this public sphere: a loss of trust in institutions that support its infrastructure and deep changes in the way knowledge of the world reaches the public. Take trust first. Across the Western world ...

 

Homophilous Sorting [...]

Birds of a feather flock together, but this is more true online than in other contexts. > The mechanisms of these new media are only now beginning to be understood. One crucial process is “homophilous sorting”: like-minded people forming clusters. The rise of cable and satellite television channels in the 1980s and 1990s made it possible to serve news tailored to ...

 

Context Collapse [...]

Social media sites collapse multiple discrete social context into one massive unforgiving context, with many bad effects. > The ethnographer danah boyd (who spells her name with lowercase letters), one of the earliest researchers of social lives online, refers to “social convergence” in social networking sites. Social convergence, she argues, occurs when multiple ...

 

Post-Truth Internet [...]

> Yet gatekeepers would be in much less trouble without the second big factor in post-truth politics: the internet and the services it has spawned. Nearly two-thirds of adults in America now get news on social media and a fifth do so often, according to a recent survey by the Pew Research Centre, a polling outfit; the numbers continue to grow fast. > On Facebook, Redd...

 

Post-truth Politics [...]

> "You can just say anything. Create realities.” > In such creation it helps to keep in mind—as Mr Putin surely does—that humans do not naturally seek truth. In fact, as plenty of research shows, they tend to avoid it. People instinctively accept information to which they are exposed and must work actively to resist believing falsehoods; they tend to think that ...

 

Face-to-Face Beats Social [...]

Face-to-face interaction within a community has a bigger influence on our worldview than digital. > So what would happen if the way we interacted with each other forced us to mix with people of different groups? If we didn’t allow ourselves to dive ever deeper into self-reinforcing groups? What would happen if we mixed primarily through that quaint and old-fashioned...

 

Lies Are Like Bacteria [...]

Lies are common, and most are harmless, maybe even necessary. It makes more sense to talk about harmful lies than simply honesty vs. lying. > One study concluded that strangers and loose acquaintances lie to each other at the rate of about three times in a ten-minute conversation. > Several studies have concluded that most people are on the receiving end of two hundr...

 

The People Derek Black Knew [...]

Derek Black, rising white nationalist star, came around to realizing the error of his beliefs not through argumentation with the enemy, but through dinners with diverse friends. > On the rare occasions when Derek directed conversation during those dinners, it was about the particulars of Arabic grammar, or marine aquatics, or the roots of Christianity in medieval time...

 

Face-to-Face Social Exposure [...]

> We found that face-to-face social exposure features explained individual political opinions on Election Day better than self-reported social ties or the views of people with whom they had political discussions. The best predictor of subject attitudes was not their friends, parents, or political discussants, but rather the attitudes of the peers who shared the same p...

 

A mathematical view of voting systems [...]

> This is only a very brief introduction to this area, and there is much more to be said. What I find engaging is that mathematical devices and constructions such as theorems and counterexamples can be applied to voting systems in order to compare them. We can say with complete confidence that no preferential voting system will ever be devised that satisfies Arro...

 

Hysteresis and System Memory [...]

> The idea of a physical system having memory can be quite counterintuitive, but many examples do exist. Imagine hanging weights on an elastic band. When you add a new weight it might stretch from 10 cm to 12 cm, say. But if you remove that new weight the band doesn’t return all the way to 10 cm, it stays a bit more stretched. This is an example of hysteresis – wh...

 

The Mpemba Paradox [...]

> If you take two identical cups, fill one with warm water and one with cold and put them in the freezer, you’d expect the cooler one to freeze first, but it doesn’t always. In fact, in many circumstances, it is the warm water that freezes first. > > This is the Mpemba paradox, named after Erasto Mpemba, who observed it as a schoolboy in Tanzania in the 1960s. Wh...

 

Game Magazine Interruption [...]

> Based on an analysis of 10,000 programming sessions recorded from 86 programmers using Eclipse and Visual Studio, and a survey of 414 programmers, we found: > > A programmer takes 10-15 minutes to start editing code after resuming work from an interruption. > When interrupted during an edit of a method, a programmer resumed work in less than a minute only 1...

 

Bayesian Credence [...]

> In order to reason about this, we have to define what these probabilities mean. In Bayesian theory, the probability that a future event will occur is called a subjective probability, or credence, something that we encountered in the Sleeping Beauty puzzle. You can make the subjective probability practical by means of a bet: If you believe on a certain day that Clint...

 

False Precision [...]

> We have all encountered examples of this in real life. The standard joke concerns the museum docent who tells a visitor that a dinosaur skeleton is 75,000,005 years old. Why? The curator explains that it was 75 million years old when he started working at the museum five years earlier. I remember a geography textbook that declared that the distance between two citie...

 

Pastry Chefs From Scratch [...]

> And yet Mr. Shields’s case illustrates how restaurants have managed to keep salaries in check. Instead of hiring a pastry chef who spent years honing her skills, he chose to hire a pair of sous-chefs in their mid-20s for each restaurant. He pays them about $35,000 a year. Mr. Shields, a longtime savory chef who did a tour at the famed Chicago restaurant Alinea, an...

 

Pastry Chef Wages [...]

> Employers, according to those in the industry, have increasingly turned to less experienced workers to ensure the flow of sweets. In effect, they are creating their own pastry chefs like so many tart shells rather than paying a premium to hire them fully formed. > > The strategy isn’t unique to the culinary world. In many booming sectors, employers have an undera...

 

Power Ventures [...]

> Vachani has had very high highs, and very low lows. In 2008, he was the CEO of a hot startup called Power Ventures. Some of the biggest investors in the Valley — the same people who back billionaire Elon Musk — backed him and his vision. > > Closed versus open Internet > > The Internet was different back then. You could say a war was brewing between two camps:...

 

Gibbet Cage [...]

> 18th century England was not a fun place. There was that whole unruliness in the Colonies, and back home executed murderers hung from poles, encased in a steel contraption known as a gibbet cage. > > In Andy Wright's examination of the now-thankfully-defunct practice of gibbeting for Atlas Obscura, he finds that the Crown would just leave these rotting metal abomi...

 

Emotional Impact of Grades [...]

> The trouble with these extreme emotional reactions to grades is that students’ knowledge of a subject is tied to their experience of the grade, says Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, associate professor of education, psychology and neuroscience at the University of Southern California. Powerful emotions attached to grades drown children’s inherent interest in any given...

 

Anti-Semitic Frameworks [...]

> I've written before about the radicalizing tendencies of the Trump campaign. Avowed anti-Semitic supporters are brought into the mainstream. Trump bellows about conspiracies of traitorous elites and global financiers - charges which don't mention Jews explicitly but which closely follow the themes, vocabulary and villains of traditional anti-Semitic agitation. Then ...

 

Getting Dumped Is Like Going Cold Turkey [...]

> Here, finally, were some of "the physiological factors" that Tennov had hoped for, an explanation for why limerence had such a powerful effect on your thoughts and actions. Each reminder of the thing you desire activates the brain's reward loop: a craving, followed by the urge to fulfill it. It's why, when you've just started dating someone, you might reread a text ...

 

For Counselors, Things Are Always Getting Worse [...]

> They may not “mean to imply simple causation,” but the whole point of their cover story is to suggest that trigger warnings and their ilk could be making kids sicker. And yet neither of their citations constitutes actual evidence of any trend of this sort. When you look at recent results of the ACCA report, it quickly becomes apparent that counselors always thin...

 

Birth of Limerence [...]

> The student's struggles, Wakin recalls, instantly transported him to the 1970s, when he was a young professor at the University of Bridgeport. At the time, one of his colleagues in the psychology department, Dorothy Tennov, was investigating the early stages of romantic relationships the period when you feel extreme and uncontrollable longing for the other person, ...

 

Trump’s Germophobia [...]

> But Trump’s germophobia goes beyond an unwillingness to shake hands—an aversion he has had to forgo during his run for the presidency. Trump is also reported to have a preference for drinking with straws and eating pizza with a fork, a distaste for pressing elevator buttons and a revulsion to fans and the public getting too close to him, such as for autographs. ...

 

Pepe’s Fall [...]

> The problem with Pepe is that he’s been stamped a hate symbol by politicians, hate groups, institutions, the media and, because of them, your mom. Before he got wrapped up in politics, Pepe was an inside-joke and a symbol for feeling sad or feeling good and many things in between. I understand that it’s out of my control, but in the end, Pepe is whatever you say...

 

Middle Age Crime Wave [...]

> ....Violent crime, which includes murder, rape, robbery and assault, rose 4% among older whites but decreased by 2% among those under age 30....Over the last 25 years — even with falling crime and recent reforms that reduced California’s prison population — older whites are the only group that has shown increased levels of imprisonment, while rates for young p...

 

Housing Behind Inequality [...]

> The results are consistent with the argument that consumer price disinflation and the deregulation of the US mortgage market during the 1980s and 1990s acted as positive credit supply shocks (with high inflation and credit market regulation in the 1970s acting as artificial borrowing constraints). The associated decline in nominal interest rates lowered the cost of ...

 

Clintons’ Wikipedia Pages Vandalized [...]

> Earlier this afternoon both Hillary Clinton and Bill Clinton’s Wikipedia pages were vandalized. Hillary’s page was edited so that the following image of a woman on her knees with her genitals exposed (edited below, but still slightly NSFW) appeared when you navigated to the page:...

 

Taking PHP Seriously [...]

> Most programmers who have only casually used PHP know two things about it: that it is a bad language, which they would never use if given the choice; and that some of the most extraordinarily successful projects in history use it. This is not quite a contradiction, but it should make us curious. Did Facebook, Wikipedia, Wordpress, Etsy, Baidu, Box, and more recently...

 

Locale Beats Demographics [...]

> We have recently shown similar results in Europe and the Middle East.7 The voting behavior of people who work in the same area and shop at the same stores is more uniform than those of a given age, gender, or socioeconomic status. Not only do we seek out environments that have people like us (birds of a feather really do flock together!), but we unconsciously pick u...

 

Echo Chamber [...]

> As a consequence, sacred beliefs are resistant to logic or evidence, because to question them is to damage our peer group membership, and undermine the social benefits we receive from it. The ability to maintain unusual identities leads to a fragmentation of our sacred beliefs and our political sphere, and increases the difficulty of obtaining consensual change.3, 4...

 

Brief History of Web Development [...]

> This is a presentation I prepared to introduce a course on web programming. It reviews the evolution of the Web since its creation and how web development has changed over the years. The first website was published only 25 years ago, and it is nice to know the technology that allowed such a great expansion in order to understand web programming nowadays....

 

Joint and Neck Pain [...]

> Case and Deaton also discovered that people are taking painkillers for good reason. The economists found that among whites aged 45-54, over a third report chronic joint pain while a fifth report say they have neck pain — and these rates have been going up in the past decade....

 

Disability and the Decline of the Working Man [...]

> Declining health is becoming a major reason prime-age men are working less and less. The Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly asks people why they aren’t in the labor force. Of the 11.5 percent of prime-age men who aren’t employed or looking for a job, over half blame illness or disability. The rest are either retired, going to school, or performing housework. >...

 

Power-Hungry Clinton [...]

> Those surveyed use the following descriptions of Hillary: intelligent (75 percent); tough-minded (65 percent); a good role model for women (48 percent); a feminist in the best possible sense (44 percent). The negatives: power-hungry (44 percent); too intense (36 percent); a wife who dominates her husband (28 percent). Most disturbing for the Clintons, however, is th...

 

Travelgate to Furnituregate [...]

> And he has already begun, this week releasing an attack ad that raised allegations of sexual harassment or assault by the former president. Some of those accusations may be familiar to readers, as might Clinton’s impeachment and his affair with Monica Lewinsky. But only Washington insiders will recall the ins-and-outs of Travelgate and Furnituregate, while Trump...

 

Peer Effects and SATs [...]

> Leonardo Bursztyn, an assistant professor at UCLA, and Robert Jensen a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, handed out fliers encouraging 11th-graders to sign up for a free SAT class. The twist: Some of the fliers said that everyone in the class would know who signed up. Some of the fliers said that decisions would be kept private. > > In honors classrooms,...

 

Dorm Mate Effects [...]

> Some of the cleanest measurements come from college dorm rooms. If your randomly assigned roommate is a bookworm, you’ll probably study more. If they’re black and you’re white, you’ll probably become more supportive of affirmative action. If you both drank in high school, then you’ll probably enable each other and get into trouble....

 

Contagious Consumption [...]

> Of course the feeling is irrational—you’re flying, through the sky!—but you hate everything right now. The airline, for its stinginess. The flight attendant, for pouring you half a can of Coke, then taking the can back. But most of all, you hate your fellow passengers. You hate humanity. > > Someone next to you swipes his credit card to buy an in-flight movie...